Accelerated Bachelor of Business – Diploma of Business Administration

Accelerated Bachelor of Business – Diploma of Business Administration

Outstanding Academics - Essential Business Experience
BBA poster
The EBU Accelerated Executive Bachelor of Business Administration (EBBA) will lead to a Diploma in Businesss Administration. The program provides mature and younger students with a comprehensive knowledge of business concepts, theories and models. The program focuses on their application to real-world problems with tangible interaction and learning. Through this approach, students learn to connect business concepts to the larger global society, with preparation for a clear career path within the field of business. They are provided with a solid preparation to continue graduate studies in business administration or related fields.
The European Commission guides Higher education institutions in awarding credits for learning outcomes acquired outside the formal learning context through work experience. The recognition is automatically followed by the award of ECTS credits in the Diploma of Business Administration program.

CORE REQUIREMENT - UPDATES IN PROGRESS...

Unit Information

 

– Overview

Examines the development of financial statements, the objectives and purpose of financial statements, including the underlying methods, concepts, principles and measurement theories. Emphasises the preparation, analysis and use of these statements to make operating, financial and investment decisions.
Topics include understanding the operating cycle, receivables, inventories, plant and equipment,
intangibles assets, liabilities, bonds, ownership and stockholders’ equity. Special topics include the
mathematics of present value theory, calculations and applications.

 

– Course Objectives

This course provides an introduction to financial accounting as the “language of business.” It
emphasizes the analysis and evaluation of accounting information from the perspective of both
investors and managers in the processes of planning, decision-making, and control. The objective
of the course is to provide an overview of financial accounting and external reporting, including the
basic accounting concepts and principles, as well as the structure of the income statement, balance
sheet, and statement of cash flows. The course covers the accounting for and the analysis of the
most common and significant business transactions of a firm, such as credit sales, delivery of
products and services, manufacturing processes and procurement, creation of operating
infrastructure, including production facilities, intellectual property, and goodwill, debt and equity
financing, as well as other (potential) obligations towards customers, suppliers, or tax authorities.

 

– Learning outcomes

At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Explain the purpose of accounting by mastering the language of business and accounting terminology.
    Understand the objectives and goals of accounting information systems and the role of financial
    statements.
  2. Explain and differentiate between the methods of accounting and the accounting for merchandising
    companies and inventories.
  3. Prepare the multistep income statement, explain the objectives and purposes of this statement and the
    articulation of this statement with the other components of the financial statements.
  4. Prepare the statement of financial position (the balance sheet), explain the objectives and purposes of
    this statement and the articulation of this statement with the other components of the financial statements.
  5. Identify and explain all of the fundamental accounts that comprise revenue, assets, liabilities and
    stockholders’ equity.
  6. Prepare the statement of cash flows, explain the objectives and purposes of this statement and the
    articulation of this statement with the other components of the financial statements.
 
– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

 

– Bibliography
  • Jones, M. (2011) Creative accounting, fraud and international accounting scandals. • Wiley . Mallin, C.
    (2010) Corporate Governance, 2nd edition. OUP.
  • Gray, R., & Bebbington, J. (2001) Accounting for the Environment.
  • Sage Griffiths, I. (1995) New Creative Accounting: how to make to profits what you want them to be. •
    Perks, R. (1995) Accounting and Society.

 

 

Unit Information

– Overview

The course focuses on basic ethical viewpoints as a foundation and examines specific characteristics of business life through cases and examples. The fact that there is no universal set of behaviours one considers ethical and no guidelines to follow to determine ethical behaviour poses unique challenges to today’s managers. Yet, managers are faced daily with situations where individual values may conflict with those of teams or organisations. The course explores topics such as corporate responsibility and conflict of interest, employee rights, and advertising and information disclosure.

– Course Objectives

  1. Understanding the basic concepts of ethics and its role in business, entrepreneurship and economy
  2. Apply ethical principles in the process of leadership and decision-making
  3. Become familiar with the benefits of corporate social responsibility in the context of globalised economic
    and social relations
  4. Identify consequences of unethical business activities
  5. Be able to recognise the essential characteristics of a “good society.”

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course, the student will be able:

  1. To understand the main types of ethical violations and the consequences of their influence on business
    practice, economy and society in general;
  2. Prove criteria of employees’ ethical behaviour in decision making in conflict situations (cases of
    business ethics commissions);
  3. To use decision-making models in ethical dilemmas and situations in the workplace;
  4. To classify and define stakeholders’ interests in social and marketing problems of the company taking
    into account the ethical dilemmas of business;
  5. To prove the need for practical realisation of initiatives of CSR.

After taking the course of Business, Ethics students should be able to:

  1. Identify the reasons for the emergence of Business Ethics and CSR concepts and the main stages
    of their genesis;
  2. Explore problems, opportunities and methods of formation of ethical and moral behaviour of personnel;
  3. Discuss possibilities of regulation of ethical violations and counteraction of corruption in the
    organisation;
  4. Recognise the effects and potential of CSR
  5. Explain how to coordinate the policy of CSR to abilities and the purposes of development of the
    organisation, which competitive advantages of SCR are used by a company;
  6. Demonstrate the ability to appraise the ideas and arguments of academics and practitioners
    to assess the validity of the conclusions reached within the context of CSR and Business
    Ethics.
  7. Understand how the management of the company can stimulate successful interaction with
    shareholders and stakeholders;
  8. Develop the ability to judge the morality of business practices and recognise the importance
    of ethics in the business environment
  9. Develop an understanding of personal responsibility in decision making.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Hutchings, K. (2010) Global Ethics. An Introduction, Polity: Cambridge • Kevin Gibson, Ethics and
    Business: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press, 2007

Unit Information

– Overview

This course offers an introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that explores critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance
and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, education, work, medicine, social policy and the family.

– Course Objectives

Throughout the semester, we will “question gender” in multiple ways:

  • Why has gender been a primary organizing principle of society?
  • How do “gendered scripts” for dress, appearance and behavior emerge among different social
    groups and in different societies and historical periods?
  • How do we explain the sexual division of labor and the unequal social status of women and girls
    and those activities and roles deemed “feminine” in society?
  • In what ways does gender intersect with race, ethnicity and sexuality?
  • How do gendered structures of power and authority operate?
  • What factors contribute to the formation and success of movements for and against gender
    equality and fluidity?

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand and engage with central debates in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies.
  2. Define and apply basic terms and concepts central to this field.
  3. Apply a variety of methods of analyzing gender in society, drawing upon both primary and secondary
    sources.
  4. Apply concepts and theories of Women’s and Gender Studies to life experiences and historical
    events and processes.
  5. Communicate effectively about gender issues in both writing and speech, drawing upon Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship and addressing a public audience

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Crawford, M. (2018). Transformations- Women, Gender, and Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill
    Education.
  • Grewa, I., & Kaplan, C. (2006). An Introduction to Women’s Studies Gender in a Transnational World.
    New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Lyons, Sofia. “Explaining the Implicit Quota on Women Executives.” New York Magazine, May 2015.
  • Smedley, Tim. “The Evidence is Growing—There Really is a Business Case for Diversity.” Financial
    Times, May 15, 2014.
  • Hunt, Vivian, Dennis Layton, et al. “Why Diversity Matters?” McKinsey & Company, January 2015

Unit Information

– Overview

This course uses case studies to give practical illustrations of financial problems. Students learn to deal with a range of cases systematically: identifying issues, determining possible impacts, evaluating proposals and producing solutions

– Course Objectives

To bring financial decisions from the business world to the classroom, through the case method approach, by helping students develop decision-making skills in unstructured, uncertain, and complex (i.e., realistic) situations.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. To apply theory to practical situations/cases
  2. To develop and analyze a business plan based on a business case
  3. To improve analytical skills
  4. To learn the analytical frameworks used to assess decisions that entrepreneurs and managers face

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  •  Case Studies in Finance: Managing for Corporate Value Creation by Bruner, Eades, Schill, 7th
    edition, New York, NY, 2014

Unit Information

– Overview

Marketing is fundamental to the operations of any organisation whether it is a local family-run convenience store, a charity, a new online game or a product-diverse multinational enterprise. The course examines the fundamentals of marketing setting them within a contemporary context to which students can relate. This course provides students with marketing case study analysis, based on real-life examples of marketing approaches and strategies. .Marketing is explored from an academic, practitioner and student (as a consumer) perspective. All require to a greater of lesser extent marketing activities. Moreover, each ane everyone one of us engages, both consciously and subconsciously, with marketing messages throughout our daily lives. As marketing plays a crucial role both in our personal lives and that of a diverse range of organisations it is considered a fundamental module. However, marketing does not operate in isolation and therefore must be considered in relation to other functional activities such as finance.

– Course Objectives

Introduce students to the core of marketing functions in organizations: promoting, communicating, launching new products and services, and creating loyal customers. Also the course aims to deliver content that explores the frameworks, ideas and concepts that underpin marketing and considers their relationship to practice.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Explain, using detailed examples, how the marketing mix operates within different organisational
    settings.
  2. Critically evaluate, using detailed examples, how a range of external factors can influence/impact
    upon marketing operations.
  3. Debate ethical issues relating to marketing operations.
  4. Explain the relevance of branding to both products and services.
  5. Evaluate evidence synthesised from a range of diverse sources.
  6. Develop rational arguments supported by reliable and validated sources of information.
  7. Engage in critical self-reflection to help identify both strengths and areas for further development.
  8. Develop their communication skills.
  9. Demonstrate their ability to be independent and take responsibility for their actions.
  10. Develop their time management skills able to meet challenging deadlines.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  •  Calkins, Breakthrough Marketing Plans (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008)

Unit Information

– Overview

This course offers an introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies, an interdisciplinary academic field that explores critical questions about the meaning of gender in society. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with key issues, questions and debates in Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship, both historical and contemporary. Gender scholarship critically analyzes themes of gendered performance
and power in a range of social spheres, such as law, culture, education, work, medicine, social policy and the family.

– Course Objectives

Throughout the semester, we will “question gender” in multiple ways:

  • Why has gender been a primary organizing principle of society?
  • How do “gendered scripts” for dress, appearance and behavior emerge among different social
    groups and in different societies and historical periods?
  • How do we explain the sexual division of labor and the unequal social status of women and girls
    and those activities and roles deemed “feminine” in society?
  • In what ways does gender intersect with race, ethnicity and sexuality?
  • How do gendered structures of power and authority operate?
  • What factors contribute to the formation and success of movements for and against gender
    equality and fluidity?

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Understand and engage with central debates in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies.
  2. Define and apply basic terms and concepts central to this field.
  3. Apply a variety of methods of analyzing gender in society, drawing upon both primary and secondary
    sources.
  4. Apply concepts and theories of Women’s and Gender Studies to life experiences and historical
    events and processes.
  5. Communicate effectively about gender issues in both writing and speech, drawing upon Women’s and Gender Studies scholarship and addressing a public audience

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Crawford, M. (2018). Transformations- Women, Gender, and Psychology. New York: McGraw-Hill
    Education.
  • Grewa, I., & Kaplan, C. (2006). An Introduction to Women’s Studies Gender in a Transnational World.
    New York: The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
  • Lyons, Sofia. “Explaining the Implicit Quota on Women Executives.” New York Magazine, May 2015.
  • Smedley, Tim. “The Evidence is Growing—There Really is a Business Case for Diversity.” Financial
    Times, May 15, 2014.
  • Hunt, Vivian, Dennis Layton, et al. “Why Diversity Matters?” McKinsey & Company, January 2015

Unit Information

– Overview

This course uses case studies to give practical illustrations of financial problems. Students learn to deal with a range of cases systematically: identifying issues, determining possible impacts, evaluating proposals and producing solutions

– Course Objectives

To bring financial decisions from the business world to the classroom, through the case method approach, by helping students develop decision-making skills in unstructured, uncertain, and complex (i.e., realistic) situations.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. To apply theory to practical situations/cases
  2. To develop and analyze a business plan based on a business case
  3. To improve analytical skills
  4. To learn the analytical frameworks used to assess decisions that entrepreneurs and managers face

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  •  Case Studies in Finance: Managing for Corporate Value Creation by Bruner, Eades, Schill, 7th
    edition, New York, NY, 2014

Unit Information

– Overview

Marketing is fundamental to the operations of any organisation whether it is a local family-run convenience store, a charity, a new online game or a product-diverse multinational enterprise. The course examines the fundamentals of marketing setting them within a contemporary context to which students can relate. This course provides students with marketing case study analysis, based on real-life examples of marketing approaches and strategies. .Marketing is explored from an academic, practitioner and student (as a consumer) perspective. All require to a greater of lesser extent marketing activities. Moreover, each ane everyone one of us engages, both consciously and subconsciously, with marketing messages throughout our daily lives. As marketing plays a crucial role both in our personal lives and that of a diverse range of organisations it is considered a fundamental module. However, marketing does not operate in isolation and therefore must be considered in relation to other functional activities such as finance.

– Course Objectives

Introduce students to the core of marketing functions in organizations: promoting, communicating, launching new products and services, and creating loyal customers. Also the course aims to deliver content that explores the frameworks, ideas and concepts that underpin marketing and considers their relationship to practice.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Explain, using detailed examples, how the marketing mix operates within different organisational
    settings.
  2. Critically evaluate, using detailed examples, how a range of external factors can influence/impact
    upon marketing operations.
  3. Debate ethical issues relating to marketing operations.
  4. Explain the relevance of branding to both products and services.
  5. Evaluate evidence synthesised from a range of diverse sources.
  6. Develop rational arguments supported by reliable and validated sources of information.
  7. Engage in critical self-reflection to help identify both strengths and areas for further development.
  8. Develop their communication skills.
  9. Demonstrate their ability to be independent and take responsibility for their actions.
  10. Develop their time management skills able to meet challenging deadlines.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  •  Calkins, Breakthrough Marketing Plans (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008)

Unit Information

– Overview

This course provides a survey of the business world. Topics include the basic principles and
practices of contemporary business. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an
understanding of business concepts as a foundation for studying other business subjects. The
course covers the following topics: The Environment of Business; Business Ownership and
Entrepreneurship; Management and Organization; Human Resources; Marketing; Finance and
Investment.

– Course Objectives

  1. To identify and describe the influence of the environments created by the economy, technology,
    competition, diversity, global opportunities, and social responsibility.
  2. To compare the advantages and disadvantages of the major forms of business ownership and
    discuss why many people are willing to accept the risks of entrepreneurship.
  3. To understand the need for management in business organisations, the role of management in
    developing an organisational structure, and the process of producing products and services that
    satisfy customers.
  4. To describe the management role of acquiring and retaining human resources and creating a
    supportive work environment.
  5. To explain the marketing function and describe the concepts and processes involved in
    designing product strategy, promotion strategy, distribution strategy, and pricing strategy.
  6. To explore the ways of using technology to manage information and to understand accounting’s
    role in managing financial information.
  7. To describe the financial management function and the role of money and financial institutions
    and to illustrate the concepts and processes involved in managing the acquisition and allocation of
    short term and long term funds.

– Learning outcomes

  1. At the completion of the course, the student will be able to:
    Identify the potential marketing opportunities that are created by the population trends; Relate how business institutions operate in our modern-day political, social and economic
    environment;
  2. Describe various business ownership forms;
  3. Acquire information about starting your own business;
  4. Explain management functions;
  5. Acquire a vocabulary for further study of business subjects;
  6. Describe the importance of marketing activities;
  7. Explain the challenges facing management;
  8. Identify basic long and short-term financial planning techniques;
  9. Describe how organisations protect themselves against potential losses;
  10. Identify and apply business laws as they affect business;
  11. 11. Discuss international trade and markets.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • G. Pearson, The Rise and Fall of Management, Gower Publishing, 2009.
  • Wren & A.G. Bedeian, The Evolution of Management Thought, 6th Edition, Wiley 2009.
  • Atrill, P. & McLaney, E (2015) Accounting & Finance for Non-Specialists. Ninth Edition.
    Pearson.
  • Boakes, K, Reading and Understanding the Financial Times. Second Edition. Prentice Hall,
    2010.
  • Willman, P. (2014) Understanding Management – the Social Science Foundations. Oxford University
    Press

Unit Information

Overview

The course will introduce students to the core of human resources function in organisations: acquiring, developing, motivating, and retaining people. The structure of HR policies and practices must enable employees to fully apply their skills to the achievement of organisational goals. Every essential element of the HR function – strategy, organizational design, policies, and programs – needs to align with HR and business strategy. In this course, the key elements of the HR function are discussed, and students, using cases related to the experience of leading international companies, to learn, how these key elements are related to organisational strategy. The course informs students about several key problems of contemporary global markets, which require essential changes of HR strategy, such as globalisation, big data, dotcoms, and organisational alternatives to traditional business structures, such as Uber, Airbnb, Alibaba.

Course Objectives

  1. Introduce students to the core of human resources function in organisations: acquiring, developing,
    motivating, and retaining people.

Learning outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Discuss the key functions and defining characteristics of HRM as a mechanism to add a competitive
    advantage to the organisation.
  2. Examine the resourcing strategies and processes that an organisation employs, commenting on the
    contribution made by the HRM function to the process.
  3. Illustrate the role of HRM in the process of performance management and the development of
    employees.
  4. Apply theories of motivation, leadership and authority to address people-related issues in an
    organisation – Analyze cases related to people management.
  5. Identify trends and challenges for HRM in the global organisational context
  6. Demonstrate the ability to work in diverse teams to provide effective solutions to HR problems.
  7. Analyse and apply concepts to explore a range of problems and operational issues that may be
    encountered within the professional framework of HRM.
  8. Apply knowledge to create, critique, and/or improve HR tools (e.g., a resume, a job ad, a performance
    evaluation sheet)
  9. Evaluate evidence synthesised from a range of diverse sources and develop rational arguments
    supported by reliable and validated sources of information.
  10. Demonstrate the ability to communicate (verbally and/or written) effectively and efficiently to the
    appropriate level, appreciating the context of HRM and the organisational / industry setting.

Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

Bibliography
  • T.B.A.

Unit Information

Overview

Course Objectives

– Learning content and outcomes

On successful completion of the course the candidate will be able to:

  1. Critically understand the different types of consumer buying behavior.
  2. Recognize the stages of the consumer buying decision process and understand how the process relates to different types of buying decisions.
  3.  Explore and evaluate how personal factors may affect the consumer buying decisión process.
  4.  Learn and understand about the psychological factors that may affect the consumer buying decision process
  5.  Understand why it is important for marketers to attempt to understand consumer buying behavior and the role of this behavior in marketing strategies.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Principles of Customer Relationship Management by Baran, Galka, Strunk, SOUTHWESTERN [CENGAGE Learning], 2008
  • Customer Relationship Management by Francis Buttle (2nd Edition), Elsevier Ltd., 2009

Unit Information

– Overview

This course presents the foundations of finance with an emphasis on applications vital for corporate
managers. We discuss most of the major financial decisions made by corporate managers both within the firm and in their interactions with investors. Essential in most of these decisions is the process of valuation, which will be emphasized throughout the course.

– Course Objectives

This course focuses on providing theoretical and practical frameworks for understanding how investors, and more importantly, how company managers, can influence both the amount and risk of cash flows to enhance shareholder value. We will examine how managers should make investment, financing, and dividend decisions that enhance stockholders’ investment value and why managements often don’t make decisions that increase shareholder value.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Explain the role of the organisation’s financial managers in realizing these strategic objectives.
  2. Be able to describe and evaluate the different sources of corporate finance (e.g.equity, debt, retained earnings and so on …), and be able to explain the relative advantages and disadvantages of each source.
  3. Understand how risk and the cost of capital impact on investment appraisal, and explain how such factors affect the value of a capital project.
  4. Explain how the corporation’s capital structure, payout policy and risk policy impact upon investment decisions.
  5. Have good understanding of, and be able to discuss current topical issues under debate in the world of corporate finance.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Jean Tirole, “The Theory of Corporate Finance”, Princeton university press, 2006.
  • Brigham, Houston. Essentials of Financial Management, 2nd Edition. Cengage Learning Asia. 2010.
  • Brealey, Myers, Marcus. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance, 5th Edition. McGraw-Hill. 2007. Solely distributed by C&E Publishing.
  • Keown, Martin, Petty, Scott. Financial Management Principles and Applications, 10th Edition. Prentice-Hall. 2005.

Unit Information

– Overview

This course introduces students to macroeconomics, the study of the economy as a whole. Macroeconomics applies the basic principles of economics to whole economic systems and the relationships among sectors of the economy. Topics include unemployment, inflation, national income and employment theory, government expenditures and taxation, the role of the banking system, and monetary and fiscal policies. The course emphasizes the development of conceptual tools to analyze the economic problems facing modern society.

– Course Objectives

The course will cover the determination of income, employment, the price level, interest rates and exchange rates in the economy. The economy will be analysed in the short run (e.g. business cycle and stabilization policy) and in the long run (e.g. economic growth). The insights of Keynesian and classical theories will be integrated. During the course a variety of simple models will be presented. As macroeconomics is an empirical discipline the course will cover case studies and statistical data interpretation. Special attention will be given to current European developments.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate knowledge of macroeconomic concepts by explaining them using appropriate
    terminology
  2. Demonstrate knowledge of macroeconomic theories by analysing their assumptions and differences,
  3. Demonstrate understanding of macroeconomic models by describing relationships among
    macroeconomic variables,
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of current macroeconomic problems by applying theories
    to concrete cases,
  5. Demonstrate and communicate an understanding of economic Policies,
  6. Demonstrate and communicate an understanding of the European Union as an economic Bloc.

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Olivier Blanchard (2017). Macroeconomics, Seventh Edition, Pearson.
  • Krugman and Wells, Eds., Macroeconomics 3 rd. ed, Worth Publishers, 2012

Unit Information

– Overview

Exchange of goods, services and capitals across borders represent a significant share of most countries gross domestic product. This course aims to teach BBA students the fundamentals of international trade in today’s global business world, including the concepts and principles of international economics. Therefore, understanding the global business context and the current global challenges reveal to be the key to success
in global commerce

– Course Objectives

The objectives of this course articulate around discovering the concepts and principles of International Trade, investigating the impacts of exchange rates and interest rates, and exploring the concept of the Balance of Trade.

– Learning content and outcomes

At the completion of the course the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the global trade environment
  2. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concepts and principles of international trade
  3. Identify and evaluate the exchange rates and interest rates impacts on global trade
  4. Critically analyse the concept of balance of trade

– Assessment

55% – Classwork (review questions, homework, essay, and other related activities)
5% – Merits
40% – Final Exam

– Bibliography
  • Schiller, B. And Gebhardt, K. (2016). The Economy Today. 14th Edition. McGraw Hill.
  • Recommended articles are available on Moodle, listed under each session.

ELECTIVE COURSES - UPDATES IN PROGRESS...

Real Graduate Experiences
Alumni - Undergraduate

Finally, I got my diploma! I took a Summer semester course on Marketing Management through [the] European Business University of Luxembourg. All this, while working remotely full-time and with two freelance clients in tow. It’s been a difficult year in our household with medical setbacks and a lot of doubt, so to have this win before the year ends is just wonderful. Thank you to Cristina González who encouraged me to be students again and take advantage of this opportunity. P.S: my tree wasn’t fully decorated at the time of this picture!

😊🎓👩🏻‍💻 #marketingmanagement #opportunity #grateful #education2021 #seniordesigner #businessdevelopment

Karen Robinson / EBU Alumni – Undergraduate

karen robisnson ebu alumni
Learn and grow with EBU Online from anywhere in the world, wherever you are in your career.
Course pre-requisites for: Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA):
  • Application essay
  • Professional CV
  • Photo Identification, e.g., Passport
  • Evidence of English Language proficiency (IELTS, TOEFL, or previous study in English)
  • Completed Secondary School Studies
  • Additional Mathematics requirement
  • Non-refundable application fee: €35
Executive Bachelor of Business Administration (EBBA):
  • Application essay
  • Professional CV
  • Previous work experience in the Business field
  • Photo Identification, e.g., Passport
  • Evidence of English Language proficiency (IELTS, TOEFL, or previous study in English)
  • Completed Secondary School Studies
  • Additional Mathematics requirement
  • Non-refundable application fee: €35